WOOT: Schema Changes History Report on Power View


The last post in this series talked about using Power View to analyze the data stored in the SQL Server’s default trace. I decided to take this a step further by creating the Schema Changes History report with the help of the data that I retrieved from the Default Traces. The advantage of a report created in Power View is that the interactivity which is missing in the standard report is available.

The way I created this report was to filter the data in the Power Pivot table using EventClass ID 46, 47 and 164 for only looking at the create, drop and alter commands which the default trace tracks. After that I created a table with a tile on the Database Name and a 100% Stacked Bar Chart to show the activity at a database level.

I also had to create linked tables for getting the Object Type and the Event Class Name that you see in the table below.

I will provide a final version of the Excel sheet once I have completed the other dashboards and sanitized the information available in the Power Pivot table.

SchemaChangesHistory

Previous Post in the Series:

Default Trace Dashboard
https://troubleshootingsql.com/2013/09/26/woot-default-trace-and-power-view/

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WOOT: Default Trace and Power View


I have been working on building visualizations for various kinds of analysis that I perform for my customers. One such useful visualization was the use of Power View for analyzing the data available in the SQL Server Default Trace. The query below lets you retrieve all the information in the default traces. This same query is used to populate the Power Pivot table in the Excel file.


declare @enable int

-- Check to find out if Default Server Side traces are running
select top 1 @enable = convert(int,value_in_use) from sys.configurations where name = 'default trace enabled'

if @enable = 1 --default trace is enabled
begin

declare @d1 datetime;
declare @diff int;
declare @curr_tracefilename varchar(500);
declare @base_tracefilename varchar(500);
declare @indx int ;

select @curr_tracefilename = path from sys.traces where is_default = 1 ;

set @curr_tracefilename = reverse(@curr_tracefilename)
select @indx = PATINDEX('%\%', @curr_tracefilename)
set @curr_tracefilename = reverse(@curr_tracefilename)
set @base_tracefilename = LEFT( @curr_tracefilename,len(@curr_tracefilename) - @indx) + '\log.trc';

select EventCat.name as Category, EventID.name as EventName, Events.*
from ::fn_trace_gettable( @base_tracefilename, default ) Events
inner join sys.trace_events EventID
on Events.EventClass = EventID.trace_event_id
inner join sys.trace_categories EventCat
on EventID.category_id = EventCat.category_id

end

Once I have all the trace data available in my Power Pivot table, I created calculated columns for Day, Hour and Minute. Now that I have all the data readily available for me, I went about creating the main dashboard which provides a view of all the events that occurred along with a time line view. All this took me less than 5 minutes after I had finished writing the query! Pretty quick. Now I have an interactive report that I can use for performing various kinds of analysis.

The screenshot below will show that there was only one event raised for the Server event category and the actual time of occurrence is shown in the line graph. A simple mouse over on the point will give you the exact details. Now isn’t that a simple way to track down events! Smile

image

I will provide a final version of the Excel sheet once I have completed the other dashboards and sanitized the information available in the Power Pivot table.

Another day at the SQL Bangalore UG Meeting


Another Saturday and another Bangalore SQL UG meeting completed! The turnout on a Saturday morning was really good. This time around the event was a bit different as we had a session on Photography by Vijay [T: @msigeek | B: iClickD]. This week’s User Group meeting was dedicated to SQL Server Tips and Tricks with Balmukund Lakhani [T: @blakhani | B: sqlserver-help] and me presenting on Management Studio and Power Pivot and Power View in Excel 2013.

Balmukund’s session as always was a superb hit where he demonstrated more than a fair share of SSMS tips and tricks. I am sure every one at the event learnt atleast a new thing about SSMS. There are multiple hidden options under the Tools->Options view in SSMS.

Vijay delivered a great session on photography which was very well appreciated by the audience!!

My session was around the the usage of Power View and Power Pivot in Excel 2013. I demonstrated how easy it was to build visualizations with Excel 2013 for administrators. I also demoed the Excel sheet that I had created using the System Health Session data. All my blog posts on this topic are available below.

PowerView and System Health Session–CPU health

PowerView and System Health Session–Scheduler Health

PowerView and System Health Session–SQL Memory Health

PowerView and System Health Session– IO Health

PowerView and System Health Session– System

The Excel file can be downloaded from Sky Drive using the link: http://sdrv.ms/10O0udO The presentation that I used for my session is available at SlideShare and also embedded below.