Awesomesauce: Perf Dashboard on Native SSRS


I had been asked the question about using the Perf Dashboard reports from a Reporting Services instance multiple times. Though this was not the intention of launching the SQL Server Performance Dashboard Reports but there is a compelling need at times to have these accessible from a web URL. In today’s age, you will find a lot of DBAs monitor their SQL Server instances remotely. Sometimes, there is another layer of complexity added to this when they want to just look at the health of the SQL Server instance by accessing a URL exposed through a corporate server in their environment. In such cases, you wouldn’t want to jump through a few hoops of setting up your VPN connection and blah blah.

So with all that in mind, let’s talk about how you can get your SQL Server 2012 Performance Dashboard to your existing SQL Server Reporting Services instance.

  • First you need to create a new Reporting Services Project using SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT).
  • Use the solution explorer to add all the existing performance dashboard reports from the C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\110\Tools\Performance Dashboard folder.
  • Modify the project properties to ensure that the data source gets written to the same folder as the reports.
  • Create a shared data source pointing to your SQL Server instance.
  • Open each report that was imported into the project and modify the data source properties to use the shared data source that you created in the above step.
  • Modify the project deployment properties as shown below.

image

Now you are ready to deploy your Performance Dashboard SSRS project to your reporting services instance.

What can you do next?

You can now set up Report Server subscriptions for the set of reports that you wish to receive via email. You can get a status report of your SQL Server instance without even having to lift a finger and that to right in your mailbox! Smile

Note that Performance Dashboard is a tool which is provided “AS-IS” by Microsoft. The steps mentioned above will help you deploy the existing Performance Dashboard reports to a SQL Server Reporting Services instance. However, the failure to deploy these reports as mentioned above is not liable for support by Microsoft SQL Server Support team.

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SQL Feature Discovery Script


As part of my work, I very frequently have to collect information about the various database engine features that are currently being used on a particular SQL Server instance. Sometimes, this requires me to write T-SQL scripts to fetch the required information. I had updated my initial data collection script some time back and this gave me the idea to write up another set of T-SQL queries to fetch the information for the database engine features in use.

The script collects a bunch of information which are categorized under the following headings:

1. General Server Configuration
        Server Info
        Non-default sp_configure settings
        Server Settings
        Active Trace Flags
2. Replication Configuration
        Replication Publishers
        Merge Replication Publishers
        Replication Subscribers
        Replication Distributors
3. Full-text enabled databases
4. Linked Servers
5. SQL Agent information
6. Databases
        Database information
        Database file information
7. Server Triggers
8. Policy Based Management
9. Resource Governor
10. Database Mail
11. Log Shipping
12. Database Mirroring
13. SQL CLR Assemblies
14. sp_OA* procedures

Usage

  1. Download the script using the link given at the bottom of the page and save it to a file named SQL_DISCOVERY.SQL. Open the script file in a SSMS Query Window.
  2. Press CTRL+SHIFT+F so that the output results are put into a file. Doing this will not produce a message or any other notification.
  3. Execute the script and specify SQL_DISCOVERY.html as the output file name so that we can get the output in the require HTML format.
  4. Once the script is completed, open the HTML file.

Script download: image

If you have any feedback about the script or feel any new additions to the existing data that is being captured, please feel free to leave a comment!

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SQLDIAG and SQL Server 2012


SQLDIAG is a data collection utility that is used for collecting T-SQL script output, perfmon data and profiler traces in a consolidated manner. This allows the database administrators for collect a single output without having to configure multiple data collection utilities for capturing the required data.

SQLDIAG has been shipping with the SQL Server product since SQL Server 2005. Now the reason I am writing this post is to talk about a specific issue that you can encounter when you already have a previous version of SQLDIAG installed on your machine along with SQL Server 2012.

Using the command below I am trying to execute a SQLDIAG data collection using a specific SQL Server 2012 SQLDIAG configuration file. The command that I used was to specify the output folder and the default SQLDIAG configuration file available at C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\110\Tools\Binn\SQLDiag.XML:

C:\>sqldiag /O "F:\Temp\SQLDIAG Output" /I "C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\110\Tools\Binn\SQLDiag.XML"

The output that I got was:

SQLDIAG Output path: F:\Temp\SQLDIAG Output\

SQLDIAG Invalid SQL Server version specified.  SQL Server version 11 is not supported by this version of the collector

SQLDIAG . Function result: 87. Message: The parameter is incorrect.

The reason for the above issue is that my environment PATH variable has the path for a previous version of SQLDIAG listed before the path of the SQL Server 2012 SQLDIAG. My path variable has the directory “C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\100\Tools\Binn\” listed before “C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\110\Tools\Binn\” which is the default location of the SQLDIAG utility. The PATH variable is updated with the SQL specific directories during a SQL Server installation. In my case, I have a SQL Server 2008 R2 instance installed on my box. So the configuration file which specifies a data collection for a SQL Server 2012 is failing because I am using a SQLDIAG from a SQL Server 2008 R2 installation.

If I executed the following command, then my SQLDIAG initialization will work correctly:

"C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\110\Tools\Binn\sqldiag.exe" /O "F:\Temp\SQLDIAG Output" /I "C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\110\Tools\Binn\SQLDiag.XML"

To summarize, you need to full qualify your SQLDIAG executable path when collecting SQLDIAG data from a machine which has multiple versions of SQLDIAG installed on the machine.